The truth about the hospital in the USSR.

The truth about the hospital in the USSR. hospitals, hospitals, Soviet, regime, wards, patients, all, people, doctors, often, Subscribe, Soviet, interiors, Soviet, so that, medicine, only, interesting, friends, happened

I wrote yesterdaybig postabout how some hospitals in modern Russia look like - about why no one has repaired these hospitals in 27 years after the collapsethe USSR, we'll talk some other time, and today I would like to draw your attention to this. Basically, all these hospitals were built during Soviet times and represent an excellent example of the very "great Soviet heritage" that Union fans continue to be proud of.
The mighty country building rockets and launching satellites had rather miserable hospitals for its ordinary citizens (with the exception of party bosses). Add to this the meager food and prison regime - and you get a complete picture of the hospitals in the USSR.
So, in today's post - the whole truth about the Soviet hospitals. In general, go under the cat, it’s interesting there, andadd friendsDo not forget)
Prison regime
The truth about the hospital in the USSR. hospitals, hospitals, Soviet, regime, wards, patients, all, people, doctors, often, Subscribe, Soviet, interiors, Soviet, so that, medicine, only, interesting, friends, happened

To begin with, in Soviet hospitals, as well as in other Soviet institutions, such askindergartens, there was a regime resembling a prison. For some of the reasons, it was believed that a person who gets inside such an institution is automatically affected in part of their rights and is lower in its social status than the staff of the “institution”.
Why did this happen? Partly because medicine in the USSR was considered "free." In fact, of course, it was not free of charge - medicine was financed from the state budget, in which all citizens of the country took part, but that was how it was presented. In practice, this resulted in quite frequent instances of the boorish attitude of doctors and other personnel towards patients, as if it showed through the attitude - “you are free here, say thank you, that you are lying here, suffering!”.
In addition to the boorish attitude, for some reason the patient was taken away all the "civilian" clothes, clothed him in the official hospital pajamas (striped colors resembling, again, a prison uniform), were forced to comply with the regime, and relatives were visited strictly by the clock — often not allowing the patient even go out to chat with relatives in the lobby of the hospital. It feels like a little more - and in the hospitals there would be punishment cells for "violators of the hospital regime."
Bad food.
The truth about the hospital in the USSR. hospitals, hospitals, Soviet, regime, wards, patients, all, people, doctors, often, Subscribe, Soviet, interiors, Soviet, so that, medicine, only, interesting, friends, happened

The food in the Soviet hospitals was lousy — just like in other Soviet state institutions, the hospital chefs stole food, then trying to build something more or less edible for the patients. Patients' questions about what the nonsense is on the menu today could have been answered by something like the fact that it is a diet food designed specifically for patients. Is there no meat in the pilaf? Meat is harmful, eat naked rice. Is there no meat in borsch too? This is a special diet borsch for flu patients, "diet table number one"!
What was a typical menu in a Soviet hospital? For breakfast - boiled buckwheat porridge and two pieces of loaf + a round piece of butter. It all washed down with a glass of tea. Lunch - some liquid cereal soup or borsch, for the second - the same buckwheat with a garlic-cutlet, at best with boiled chicken (unknown parts of chicken carcass of various shapes and sizes), dried fruit compote. Everything is cold, of course. For dinner - the same porridge, but already oatmeal, or two sausages. Fruits and vegetables were a terrible deficit, at best for dinner they could give half a raw tomato or cucumber - and even then that happened only in late spring and summer.
With such a melancholy diet, it was not so easy for patients - here, as in prison, food programs were saved from home.
Ugly interiors.
The truth about the hospital in the USSR. hospitals, hospitals, Soviet, regime, wards, patients, all, people, doctors, often, Subscribe, Soviet, interiors, Soviet, so that, medicine, only, interesting, friends, happened

Practically all the Soviet hospitals had rather creepy government interiors - shabby wooden or (most often) armored beds, painted blue, blue or green walls, a nasty type of linoleum on the floor. The linen was state-owned, with the inscription "Ministry of Health" in the form of patterns - this is so that the linen would not be stolen by the staff (although it was still stolen).
Well, at the expense of the choice of materials is understandable - they were chosen such that the floor and walls were easy to clean, but now the look? In my opinion, no one thought about making the interior of a ward in a Soviet hospital more or less pleasant for patients - everything inside looked like a state institution, everywhere there were huge and crooked inventory numbers, under the beds were pots with red "vomit" inscriptions - Of course, such interiors did not raise the mood of the patient. In addition - often wards were cramped and "overcrowded."
Only hospitals and polyclinics began to look more or less decently, built completely from scratch in the late Soviet years - approximately in the period 1980-1991, and before that all hospitals looked eerie and only kind of oppressed people who had got there.And this, I remind you, was happening in a country that claimed some kind of "world ideological domination".
Doctors and methods of treatment.
The truth about the hospital in the USSR.hospitals, hospitals, Soviet, regime, wards, patients, all, people, doctors, often, Subscribe, Soviet, interiors, Soviet, so that, medicine, only, interesting, friends, happened

Well, okay, you say - a terrible attitude, bad food and ugly wards is not the most important thing, but did they cure everyone in Soviet hospitals? And yes and no - those who talk about some kind of "particularly effective Soviet medicine" are simply being implanted - the effectiveness depended heavily on specific doctors and the availability of drugs, and often problems with the other also occurred.
In truly developed countries, the profession of a doctor is one of the most highly paid, especially for those medical specialties that directly affect the lives of people — surgeons, anesthesiologists, etc. In the USSR, with its total “equalization”, doctors received + - as much as other citizens, because of which doctors did not have an additional incentive to somehow improve their professional skills, continue to learn, etc. In Soviet medicine, it was most often possible to meet just such “strong middling”, and in the eighties, when it became possible to travel abroad, all the classy doctors left for the United States, Germany and Israel.
The same applies to methods of treatment, with normal drugs (as well as with experts) there have been disruptions. It often happened when citizens were treated by very controversial methods in Soviet hospitals - literally “iodine and green paint”, they prescribed some ineffective “cough pills” or put banks - modern medicine completely rejects this procedure, considering it a simple placebo.
Instead of an epilogue.
The truth about the hospital in the USSR. hospitals, hospitals, Soviet, regime, wards, patients, all, people, doctors, often, Subscribe, Soviet, interiors, Soviet, so that, medicine, only, interesting, friends, happened

The Soviet Union on paper and propaganda posters was presented as a "country of universal equality", but no equality actually existed - as many researchers of the USSR noted, after the coup of 1917 in the territory of the former Russian Empire an even more rigid caste hierarchical society was established than it was before 1917 of the year.
This was also noticeable in medicine - party officials and workers, as well as intelligence officers were treated in separate comfortable hospitals - where there was a completely different service, and all the necessary medicines, and imported disposable syringes. For people with a slightly lower rung of the hierarchical ladder, there were separate wards in ordinary hospitals with a slightly better service,and the bulk of the people had to be content with what was described in today's post.
Do you remember the hospital inthe USSR? What is the most memorable?
Tell us in the comments, interesting.





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